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Take a Moment of Transition

Available to you at any time--here's an example: when you get home from work, before you get out of your car, you can take a moment--to breathe, to think about how the day went, about how you're feeling in that moment...


You can notice whatever thoughts you have, but take a moment to add, as you think about how you would like the rest of the evening to go, that anything can happen.


It's obviously pretty unlikely that some extreme thing will happen, but by giving yourself that possibility--that anything could happen--you give a little space for expectations or hopes that you might not even be aware of (i.e., it would be nice if hot dinner was ready, the dog was walked and the home wasn't a mess).


You may not even realize you cared about such things until you walk in and realize that none of those things are a reality, and a resentment sparks...In contrast, if you enter after having thought that anything could happen, the impact of what you find there could be eased--even by just a bit.


And like I said, that's just one example of a transition. Here are others:

After waking, but before you get up

Before you get behind the wheel

Before you walk in to work or school or wherever you are heading

Before you meet someone you care about


Take a breath, notice that you're making a transition, and then go onward...

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    ©2020 by Paul Gutrecht, LMFT 96168